The Nilson Report Copyright Policy

Copyright protection for the paper version of The Nilson Report includes a prohibition against photocopying all or any portion of the newsletter, or scanning it into an internal database. Doing so is illegal anywhere in the world. Notwithstanding the above, subscribers will be permitted to photocopy individual articles for their own personal use only. Copyright protection for the electronic version is the same as the paper version — duplication is against the law. Subscribers may not print out all or any portion of the issue. Notwithstanding the above, subscribers may print out individual articles for their own personal use only. Additionally, subscribers are not permitted to forward their electronic version to other individuals by any means, including but not limited to email or CD. Nor may subscribers post electronic issues on their company's Intranet or on any Web site server anywhere in the world. Subscribers can retain issues on their own computers indefinitely.

Article reprinted with permission from The Newsletter on Newsletters – September 14, 2007
Random Lengths settles copyright suit for $300,000 and court injunction against the perp


Prominently featured – for the benefit and education of its readers – is this announcement in the August 24 issue of Random Lengths, “The Weekly Report on North American Forest Products Markets”: “Random Lengths recently settled a lawsuit it filed against Carter Lumber Co., Kent, Ohio, alleging that Carter Lumber infringed Random Lengths' copyright. The suit was filed in Federal District Court, Portland, Oregon, on January 23, 2007 following three months of communication between the two companies. Random Lengths alleged that Carter Lumber systematically forwarded Random Lengths' reports to some of the company's branches and customers without permission from or payment to Random Lengths.

“Carter Lumber denied the allegations, but paid Random Lengths $300,000 and was enjoined by the court from copying or retransmitting Random Lengths' reports and from distributing reports derived from Random Lengths' publications. “'Litigation like this is expensive in dollars and time for both parties and diverts us from our mission of serving our subscribers,' said publisher Jon Anderson. 'However, we must defend our copyrights when we believe they are being infringed. To not do so would put our company's future at great risk. In pursuing this case, we also stood up for the vast majority of our subscribers who respect our copyrights.'”

Article reprinted from The Nilson Report
Issue 810, May 2004

Copyright suit brings $19.7-million fine Legg Mason Inc., a financial-services corporation, has been ordered to pay Lowry’s Reports, a small Florida-based newsletter publisher, millions of dollars for circulating duplicated copies of one of its publications. The federal court in Maryland found that Legg Mason had paid $700 for a single subscription to Lowry’s New York Stock Exchange Analysis, then redistributed it within he company by fax, email, photocopying, and posting on the company’s Intranet. The jury award of $825,000 in contract damages and $18.9 million in statutory damages under the Copyright Act was made last year, and Legg Mason’s motion for a new trial was recently rejected. An appeal is pending.
In denying a new trial, the judge ruled that the jury’s verdict was supported by the evidence submitted, and that its judgment as to the proper amount of so-called “statutory damages” should receive “substantial deference.” The Copyright Act allows awards of between $750 and $150,000 for each infringement. The jurors awarded $50,000 for each newsletter that was duplicated before Lowry’s sent out a warning letter, and $100,000 for each duplication that occurred afterwards.

© 2013 HSN Consultants, Inc. THE NILSON REPORT All Rights Reserved. Reproducing or allowing reproduction or dissemination of any portion of this newsletter in any manner for any purpose is strictly prohibited and may violate the intellectual property rights of HSN Consultants, Inc. d/b/a The Nilson Report.

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